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Table 1 Angiography for Pelvic Fracture Management at Level I Trauma Centers

From: Variability in the timeliness of interventional radiology availability for angioembolization of hemodynamically unstable pelvic fractures: a prospective survey among U.S. level I trauma centers

Questions and Possible Responses % (n) n
What agency’s guideline is your trauma center following for pelvic fracture management?
 No guideline in place 28% (11) 40
 Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma 23% (9)
 Hospital developed protocol 18% (7)
 Western Trauma Association 15% (6)
 Trauma Quality Improvement Program 8% (3)
 Advanced Trauma Life Support 5% (2)
 Agency not specified 5% (2)
Does your hospital use both angioembolization and pelvic packing for pelvic fracture management?
 Yes 85% (23) 27
 No 15% (4)
Angioembolization or Pelvic Packing First?
 Angioembolization 63% (17) 27
 Pelvic packing 37% (10)
Does your trauma center have a mobile c-arm?
 Yes 100% (36) 36
 No 0
Indicators for angioembolization
 Contrast extravasation 60% (21) 35a
 Hemodynamically unstable 46% (16)
 Physician’s discretion 17% (6)
 Hemodynamically stable 14% (5)
 APC, LC, or VS fracture pattern 9% (3)
 After pelvic packing 9% (3)
 After a circumferential compression device 9% (3)
 Pelvic hematoma 9% (3)
 Requiring ongoing transfusions 9% (3)
 After REBOA 3% (1)
 Pseudoaneurysm 3% (1)
When contrast extravasation is absent on computed tomography, but the patient is hemodynamically unstable, is angioembolization considered a treatment option?
 Yes 70% (25) 36
 No 31% (11)
What treatment is utilized while waiting for IR to set-up?
 Circumferential compression device 90% (35) 39a
 Pelvic packing 64% (25)
 REBOA 44% (17)
 Exploratory laparotomy 31% (12)
 Other (massive transfusion protocol) 3% (1)
  1. a Participants allowed to select multiple responses, IR interventional radiology, REBOA resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta, APC anterior-posterior compression, LC lateral compression, VS vertical shear