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Table 4 Defining Hemodynamic Instability for Patients with Pelvic Fractures

From: A descriptive survey on the use of resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta (REBOA) for pelvic fractures at US level I trauma centers

Survey QuestionResponses% (n)n
What measures are used to define hemodynamic instability for pelvic fractures?SBP25% (9)36
SBP and HR25% (9)
SBP, HR, and Lactate14% (5)
SBP, HR, and Other3% (1)
SBP, HR, Lactate, and INR17% (6)
SBP, HR, Lactate, and Other11% (4)
SBP, HR, Lactate, INR, and Other6% (2)
What measures are used to define a hemodynamic instability for pelvic fractures?SBP100% (36)36
HR75% (27)
Lactate47% (17)
INR22% (8)
Other19% (7)
What “other” methods are used to define hemodynamic instability in pelvic fractures?Base deficit29% (2)7
ROTEM or TEG29% (2)
Radiology14% (1)
Requiring Transfusion14% (1)
Diastasis at Pubic Symphysis14% (1)
How do you define measures of hemodynamic instability for pelvic fractures? Most common response (n)SBP<  90 (20)36
Heart Rate>  100 (10), >  120 (10)27
Lactate>  2 (7)17
INR> 1.5 (3)8
How do you define measures of hemodynamic instability for pelvic fractures? Range of responses.SBP<  80 - ≤ 10027
Heart Rate<  60–12536
Lactate>  2–1017
INR> 1.1 - > 2.58
How are “other” measures of hemodynamic instability for pelvic fractures defined?Base deficit−5, 67
ROTEM or TEGNot defined
RadiologyNot defined
Requiring Transfusion
Diastasis at Pubic Symphysis
Not defined
> 2.5 cm
  1. SBP systolic blood pressure, HR heart rate, INR international normalized ratio, ROTEM rotational thromboelastography, TEG thromboelastography